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Why Some College Professors Struggle To Get Home Loans

Unpredictability is one of the defining characteristics of life as an adjunct professor. Adjuncts’ income can change dramatically from one year to the next, or from one semester to the next. That makes it hard to plan long-term and make big financial decisions, like the one on Barbara Need’s mind.
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Counties across New York are concerned over reports that sales tax collections are plummeting, and are asking Governor Cuomo’s tax department for a more detailed explanation.

A report by the state comptroller states that sales tax collections are half of what they were a year ago. The New York State Association of Counties are upset, says the group’s Steven Aquario.

“Are we seeing a trend here?” Aquario asked.

Bret Jaspers / WSKG

Governor Cuomo was in Kirkwood on Tuesday to announce a multimillion dollar state and local investment that will bring in 600 new jobs. The money finances a new headquarters for Kirkwood-based Modern Marketing Concepts, Inc.

Many scientists believe a giant asteroid crashed into Earth millions of years ago killing off the dinosaurs. To avoid a similar catastrophe, Cornell researcher Sean Marshall is in Puerto Rico to take a closer look at the asteroid JD6 1999, which passed by Earth a couple weeks ago. 

Braden Swenson wanders into a semi-rickety wooden shed on his search for gold, treasure and riches.

"Is there any treasure in here?" he asks in the endearing dialect of a 4-year-old. "I've been looking everywhere for them. I can't find any." The proto-pirate toddler conducts a quick search, then wanders away to continue his quest elsewhere.

Not far away, Ethan Lipsie, age 9, clutches a framing hammer and a nine-penny nail. He's ready to hang his freshly painted sign on a wooden "fort" he's been hammering away on. It says, "Ethan, Hudson and William were here."

An epic legal battle is about to begin over President Obama's plan to address climate change, in which the Environmental Protection Agency is putting in place new limits on greenhouse gases from power plants. Critics argue the plan is on shaky legal ground, but the administration says it's prepared to defend the regulations in court.

In announcing the "Clean Power Plan" on Monday, Obama predicted some of the arguments his critics would make.

During a severe drought in 2011, JennaDee Detro noticed that many trees on the family cattle ranch in Cat Spring, Texas, withered, but a certain evergreen holly appeared vigorous. It's called a yaupon.

"The best we can tell is that they enjoy suffering," Detro says with a laugh. "So this kind of extreme weather in Texas — and the extreme soil conditions — are perfect for the yaupon."

Detro began researching yaupon — a tree abundant in its native range, from coastal North Carolina to East Texas — and discovered that the plant contains caffeine and has a remarkable history.

Solvejg Wastvedt/WSKG News

Unpredictability is one of the defining characteristics of life as an adjunct professor. Adjuncts’ income can change dramatically from one year to the next, or from one semester to the next. That makes it hard to plan long-term and make big financial decisions, like the one on Barbara Need’s mind.

President Obama’s plan for reducing power plant emissions is based, in part, on a cap and trade type program already in existence in New York.  

Conor Bambrick, with the group Environmental Advocates, says he thinks the Presidents’ plan, billed by the White House as the “first-ever national standards” to curb carbon pollution from power plants, has some of its roots in New York.

Updated at 1:30am ET

Delta says it will no longer allow freight shipments of big game trophies. The decision follows the killing of a popular lion in Zimbabwe.

The airline said in a statement on Monday that, effective immediately, it "will officially ban shipment of all lion, leopard, elephant, rhinoceros, and buffalo trophies."

Toy guns that look real should no longer be sold in New York.

NPR's Joel Rose reports that retailers who were selling realistic-looking toy guns have agreed to halt their sales of the product. Wal-Mart, Amazon and other retailers have also agreed to pay $300,000 in fines as part of a settlement announced Monday.

An investigation by the New York attorney general's office found more than 6,000 toy guns that violate New York law were sold in the state in the past three years.

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