Katie Colaneri

State Impact Pennsylvania Reporter

 Katie Colaneri is a reporter for StateImpact Pennsylvania and WHYY in Philadelphia covering energy and the environment. Before joining StateImpact, Katie worked as an investigative and enterprise reporter at WBGO in Newark, New Jersey. She covered some of New Jersey's biggest stories including the devastation and aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in 2012 and Tropical Storm Irene in 2011, as well as the day-to-day triumphs and struggles to revitalize state's largest city. A native of New Jersey with roots in South Central Pennsylvania, Katie holds a bachelor's degree from Wellesley College.

    MARIE CUSICK/ STATEIMPACT PENNSYLVANIA

    The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection is working on a plan to avoid losing control over its safe drinking water program, along with millions in federal dollars. 

    Tom Wolf campaign / via Facebook

    After failing to pass a natural gas severance tax for the last two years, Governor Tom Wolf is hoping this year, the legislature will get on board with his proposal. Following an event at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia Tuesday evening, Wolf said he plans to ask for a tax on Marcellus Shale drillers during his 2017/2018 fiscal year budget address next month. However, he was mum on the details, which he said are still being worked out with legislators and the natural gas industry.

    Emma Lee/WHYY

    (Keystone Crossroads) Imani Sullivan waited patiently. From her seat near the back of a mostly empty Temple University auditorium, she listened to the handful of anti-poverty advocates on stage for a panel coinciding with July’s Democratic National Convention. 

    NewsWorks and AP file photos

    In the race to replace disgraced former Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane, voters will choose between a self-styled government reformer and a state senator -- both from Montgomery County. With just over a month until Election Day, the TV ad war has begun.

    BRAD LARRISON / WHYY

    On a recent afternoon, local politicians and business leaders gathered at the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal in South Philadelphia. Standing in front of a giant blue and white crane used to lift containers off cargo ships, U.S. Senator Bob Casey told reporters he’s confident Congress will approve the last chunk of federal funding needed to deepen the Delaware River’s shipping channel this year.

    Emma Lee / WHYY

    Democratic state Senator Anthony Williams is calling on Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Michael Eakin and other officials to resign for their roles in the "porngate" email scandal. Williams met Monday morning with a group of community and religious leaders, including Philadelphia NAACP head Rodney Muhammed, where he showed them 10 of the emails traded among prosecutors, public defenders, judges and other members of the state judicial system.

    Diana Robinson / Keystone Crossroads

    In another twist in Pennsylvania's "Porngate" scandal, state Attorney General Kathleen Kane released another round of pornographic emails Thursday that were sent to the private email account of a state Supreme Court Justice. The latest email dump comes the same day Kane's law license was officially suspended because of criminal charges pending against her in Montgomery County.

    WabbyTwaxx / Flickr

    As Republican legislative leaders and the natural gas industry unite to beat back Gov. Tom Wolf’s severance tax proposal, here’s something lawmakers in Harrisburg are not talking about: Companies building new pipelines to grow markets for Pennsylvania’s natural gas don’t have to pay local property taxes on those lines to counties, towns and school districts.

    Katie Colaneri / StateImpact Pennsylvania

    Pennsylvania's Department of Environmental Protection is fining a subsidiary of the energy giant Chevron about $1 million.

    The fine is for violations relating to a fatal explosion at a natural gas well site early last year.

    Katie Colaneri / StateImpact Pennsylvania

    Several feet below some of Rob Fulper's fields are two pipelines. They were laid during World War II to move crude oil from the Gulf Coast up to the Northeast, decades before these tracts were preserved.

    Today, these pipelines move natural gas.

    In the summer, when the weather is hot and dry, Fulper said he can see the results of the extra heat the pipelines throw off.

    To read more about Fulper and the proposed PennEast pipeline, click here.

    WabbyTwaxx / flickr

    A new study commissioned by the consortium of companies behind the PennEast pipeline finds it would generate $1.62 billion for the Pennsylvania and New Jersey economies during the project’s construction phase.

    PennEast Pipeline Company

    The Delaware River Basin Commission has prevented natural gas drillers from drilling in the watershed since 2010. And now the multi-state commission will now help determine whether a new natural gas pipeline can move forward.
     
    The proposed PennEast pipeline would cut under the Delaware River to deliver natural gas from Pennsylvania to heat homes in New Jersey. It would also pass through reservoirs and state parks. That’s why the basin commission has decided to review the project’s potential impact on the watershed.

    Map courtesy of PennEast Pipeline Company

    A new billion-dollar pipeline project is being proposed to bring natural gas from the Marcellus Shale to customers on the East Coast.

    Kristin McCarthy, a township committeewoman in Delaware, New Jersey, has one request for voters this Tuesday.

    "I'm asking people not to vote for me," says McCarthy.

    She wants to step down from local government to devote more time to fighting the PennEast pipeline, which would bring natural gas from the Marcellus Shale in northeast Pennsylvania to customers in New Jersey. That includes electric generation companies looking to switch from coal to natural gas.

    Matt Richmond / WSKG News

    A major oil and gas services company’s breast cancer awareness campaign has sparked a backlash from some women’s health advocates and anti-fracking groups.

    Fans packing into Heinz Field for Sunday’s Steelers-Colts game were met by a handful of protestors with signs warning passersby to “think before they pink.”

    At half time, the CEO of drilling services company Baker Hughes handed over a $100,000 check to the Susan G. Komen foundation. The company is also distributing 1,000 pink drill bits to its customers around the world.

    Dana Dolney is with Friends of the Harmed, a group working with Pennsylvania residents who say their health has been hurt by nearby oil and gas development. She’s also a breast cancer survivor.

    Brad Clinesmith / via flickr

    The State of Pennsylvania is facing a safety concern similar to one that has been in the news recently in New York: On any given week… up to 75 trains carrying crude oil from the Bakken Shale in North Dakota roll through the Keystone State.

    Over the last year… a sharp increase in accidents involving these oil trains has prompted emergency officials in Pennsylvania to make sure first responders are prepared.

    Officials from about seven government agencies, the railroad CSX and the refinery in South Philadelphia are responding to a faux fiery train accident on a rail bridge right in the city’s downtown.

    Matt Richmond / WSKG News


    A bill in the Pennsylvania legislature would eliminate the 150-foot buffer zones required between new developments and high-quality waterways.

    Thick rows of trees and shrubs help keep pollution from washing off buildings and pavement into streams and rivers. But developers say waterfront property is valuable and 150 feet can be too much to ask for certain projects.

    David Hess is a former secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection.

    "Well, the regulation is really very narrow. It really only applies to a small percentage of the watersheds in Pennsylvania and even there, there are a lot of exemptions," says Hess.

    Pennsylvania State Attorney General Kathleen Kane has filed criminal charges against gas driller EQT Corporation for a major pollution incident.   In 2012, state regulators said EQT allowed hundreds of gallons of flowback fluid to leak from an impoundment pond in Tioga County, in north central Pennsylvania.

    Matt Richmond / WSKG News

    Pennsylvania State Attorney General Kathleen Kane has filed criminal charges against gas driller E-Q-T Corporation for a major pollution incident.

    In 2012, state regulators say EQT allowed hundreds of gallons of flowback fluid to leak from an impoundment pond in Tioga County, north central Pennsylvania. They say it seeped into groundwater and polluted nearby streams.

    Crozet, M. / flickr

    StateImpact Pennsylvania has been taking us on a trip down the Turnpike from west to east, looking at the state’s energy economy.

     

    During the 300-mile drive, we’ve gone below ground into a coal mine, inside a wind turbine and visited  a nuclear power plant. To listen to all of the stories, visit the series website.

     

    StateImpact Pennsylvania has been taking us on a trip down the Turnpike from west to east, looking at the state’s energy economy.   During the 300-mile drive, we’ve gone below ground into a coal mine, inside a wind turbine and visited a nuclear power plant. In the final installation of the five-part series, Katie Colaneri takes us to one of the country’s oldest oil refineries in Philadelphia, a place that has gotten new life from the shale boom. For the full story, check out StateImpact Pennsylvania.

    Nick Cross / Flickr

    Today, we continue our journey on the Pennsylvania Turnpike, seeking glimpses of the state’s energy past, present and future.

    Last time, we went one thousand feet underground to a coal mine in southwestern Pennsylvania.

    In the second of five parts, StateImpact Pennsylvania’s Katie Colaneri looks at a relatively new industry that, until recently, has been growing in Pennsylvania: wind.

    For the full story, check out StateImpact Pennsylvania.

    Today, we continue our journey on the Pennsylvania Turnpike, seeking glimpses of the state’s energy past, present and future.   Last time, we went one thousand feet underground to a coal mine in southwestern Pennsylvania. In the second of five parts, StateImpact Pennsylvania’s Katie Colaneri looks at a relatively new industry that, until recently, has been growing in Pennsylvania: wind. For the full story, check out StateImpact Pennsylvania.

    For the last 10 years, a mystery has been unfolding in the Susquehanna watershed. Young smallmouth bass have been found with open sores and lesions. Many of the male fish that make it to adulthood have female sexual characteristics. The smallmouth bass population has declined threatening the state’s $3 billion recreational fishing industry. What’s causing these strange symptoms?

    Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Protection has levied its largest fine ever against a natural gas driller. For the full story, check out StateImpact Pennsylvania.

    A new study has found that residents in western Pennsylvania living close to natural gas drilling sites were twice as likely to report health problems than those living farther away. Public health researchers from Yale University and the University of Washington went door to door and surveyed the health of nearly 500 adults and children in Washington County, southwest of Pittsburgh. Those living within 0.6 miles of natural gas wells reported more skin and upper respiratory problems. Dr.

    Since the hydrofracking boom began in Pennsylvania, drillers have paid landowners millions of dollars as royalty payments. Now, a researching want to study how all that money is impacting children and their parents. Check out the full story at StateImpact Pennsylvania.

    The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection has posted a list of the cases on its website with links to the letters sent to homeowners confirming their water well was polluted or impacted by gas development.

    Names and addresses have been redacted, but the list shows wells were contaminated or suddenly produced less water in spots across the Marcellus Shale region.

    Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane is reportedly widening her investigation into whether landowners are being shortchanged on royalty payments from their natural gas leases.

    To read the full story, visit StateImpact Pennsylvania.

    In response to allegations it discouraged employees from responding to complaints about Marcellus Shale drilling Pennsylvania’s Department of Health is updating its policies for handling these concerns.

    To read the full story, visit StateImpact Pennsylvania.