Randy Gorbman

Randy Gorbman is WXXI's Director of News and Public Affairs. Randy manages the day-to-day operations of WXXI News on radio, television, and online. 

Randy has over 30 years of broadcast news experience, and was recently news director at WHAM-AM in Rochester. Randy has also been news director, writer, announcer, and producer at radio stations in several cities in New York and Connecticut, as well as working as an editor at the NBC Radio Network. He served as past president of the New York State Associated Press Broadcasters' Association, and is currently a member of its Board of Directors.

Randy has also taught journalism to local students, serving as adjunct instructor at SUNY Geneseo and Monroe Community College.

Randy received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication from the S. I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, and his Master's degree in Liberal Arts from SUNY Empire State College.

A wrongful death lawsuit against NASCAR driver Tony Stewart could be headed to Rochester.

According to ESPN, Stewart’s lawyers are requesting that the case filed by the parents of Kevin Ward Jr. be moved from federal court in Utica (which is the court that covers the Ward family hometown of Port Leyden), to the federal court in Rochester, which covers the area of Canandaigua Motorsports Park, where Ward was killed.

Blue-Green Algae Now Found In At Least 3 Area Lakes

The Ontario County Health Department says that the presence of blue-green algae has been confirmed in parts of Honeoye, Seneca and Canandaigua Lakes.

A regional banking company is out with an economic survey that is generally positive for Upstate New York as well as other parts of the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states. The semi-annual survey of M&T bank's business customers shows that mid-sized companies remain optimistic about near-term growth prospects.

Rochester-based Xerox has acquired a Massachusetts based company which provides patient access and reimbursement services for more than 17 major pharmaceutical companies.

A top U.S. Treasury official led a town hall meeting Monday at the Women's Rights National Historical Park in Seneca Falls.

It was all about the discussion of putting a woman on the $10 bill. The Treasury Department is working on a redesign of the $10  bill, with plans to put a woman on that currency in time for the 100th anniversary of the amendment that gave women the right to vote.

The Treasurer of the United States Rosie Rios spoke before a standing room crowd in the Wesleyan Chapel. As she read through questions submitted by the audience, one came up again and again.

A top federal Treasury official comes to Seneca Falls today to hold a town hall style meeting to get input on a new $10 bill. The forum is being held in the Finger Lakes after a push by Senator Chuck Schumer, who said Seneca Falls is a good place to discuss which American woman should be on the new $10 bill because of its natural symbolism when it comes to women’s rights.

Randy Gorbman / WXXI

Rochester Police have made an arrest in connection with the mass shooting on Genesee Street last week that took three lives and injured four others. But authorities say they cannot yet release a lot of details about the suspect. 

Leaders of two local youth organizations in Rochester are trying to help members of their groups move forward with efforts to keep violence out of their lives.  The effort follows Wednesday night's horrific shooting on Genesee Street in Rochester that left three people dead and four wounded. 

Keith Ewing / Flickr

Dozens of people gathered at Ontario Beach Park on Sunday to continue their call for what has become a controversial part of the carousel to be taken down. The demonstrators are upset about illustration which depicts two black children in an exaggerated manner on the 110 year old carousel, in what Howard Eagle, one of the organizers of the protest, says is an example of the dehumanizing "pickaninny" art that began in the 1800s. Read More...

A Geneva winery, Ventosa Vineyards, was awarded the "Governor's Cup" on Wednesday at the 2015 New York Wine & Food Classic competition held in Watkins Glen. The "Winery of the Year" award went to Paumanok Vineyards of Long Island. Lt. Governor Kathy Hochul presented the large silver chalice, the Governor's Cup, to Ventosa. This year's competition included 858 New York wines, 20 hard ciders and 332 craft spirits from several regions across the state. (READ MORE)

The Hillside Family of Agencies says it is expanding in the Southern Tier with a new affiliation with the Stillwater Residential Facility. That's in Greene, New York, not far from Binghamton.

Stillwater provides therapeutic treatment for youths ages 7 to 18. Officials say the affiliation with Hillside is all part of the agency's effort to provide comprehensive health,education and human services for children and families whose challenges threaten their abilities to reach their full potential.

The New York State Department of Labor has announced the Finger Lakes Region’s Top Five Trending Jobs for 2015 -- selected by labor market analysts based on occupational survey data and the projected needs of their region.

The following job titles (and their annual median wage) are likely to see greater than normal growth through the end of 2015:

A new survey released on Martin Luther King Jr. Day by Siena College shows that two-thirds of the state residents polled feel that race relations in New York State are only fair or poor. Those numbers got worse compared to last year, when 51 percent of New Yorkers felt the same way.

 

President Obama on Friday announced a new competition to award more than $200 million in public and private investment to create an Integrated Photonics Manufacturing Institute.

The unemployment rate in the Rochester area dropped in August by a full point compared to last year at this time. The August jobless rate was 5.8 percent, down slightly from July's 6.1 percent rate, and down from 6.8 percent  in August of a year ago.

State labor analyst Tammy Marino says we have seen continued improvement, although the rate is still higher than normal.

Officials are announcing the completion of a nearly $15 million highway project near the University of Rochester. It is the second phase of the so-called 'Access 390 ' initiative, and it involves the opening Tuesday of a new entrance ramp from Kendrick Road to I-390 north in Rochester.

State Transportation Department spokeswoman Lori Maher says it will help improve safety and reduce traffic congestion in that area.

Three Rochester companies have been named recipients of a 2014 ETHIE Award, which was presented Monday night by the Rochester Area Business Ethics Foundation.

In the large-sized category (with more than 150 employees), the ETHIE recipient is Iberdrola-RG&E.

In the medium-sized category (between 50 and 150 workers), the ETHIE was awarded to Genesee Valley Motors in Avon.

And in the small-sized category (less than 50 employees) the Ethie went to Rainbow Restorations of Rochester.

The National Toy Hall of Fame at the Strong Museum in Rochester is out today with its 12 toy "finalists" for this year's induction ceremonies.

The nominees are: American Girl Dolls; Bubbles; Fisher Price Little People; Hess Toy Trucks; Little Green Army Men; My Little Pony; Operation Skill Game; Paper Airplane; Pots & Pans; Rubik's Cube; Slip 'N Slide; and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

Charles Plosser is retiring from his role as President and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

The 66 year old Plosser, a former dean of the University of Rochester's Simon School of Business, will retire effective next March.  

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said that Plosser "has been an insightful and dedicated leader and colleague," and she says they will miss his "keen insights, deep analysis, and good humor."

Plosser has been president of the Philadelphia Fed since 2006. He was dean of the Simon School from 1993 to 2003.

A new survey shows that a majority of people living in Upstate New York are worried about their personal finances.

The Times Union/Siena College poll shows that 58 percent of upstaters say it is somewhat or completely true that they spend more time than before worrying about money.

Federal officials will be in Rochester later this week to help former workers in the nuclear weapons industry find out about compensation they may be eligible for.

The U.S. Labor Department says that from the 1940s through the 1980s, workers in the nuclear weapons industry may have been exposed to radiation while performing their jobs. That includes 15 facilities in Western New York, including an atomic energy project at the University of Rochester. After World War II, that operation focused on the biomedical aspects of nuclear energy.

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