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Study: Rising CO2 levels threaten global marine life

14 hours ago

The rising acidity of ocean waters due to increased levels of atmospheric CO2 will have profound adverse effects on sea life, according to a new study.

The report, called “Exploring Ocean Change,” from the group Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification, or BIOACID, shows rising acidity leads to habitat loss and disrupts the growth and reproduction of sea life.

Losing ground

Nov 9, 2017

In 1996, Eddie Wise, the son of a sharecropper, purchased a farm with a loan from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Twenty years later, the USDA foreclosed on the property and evicted him. Reveal investigates his claim that he was discriminated against because of his race.

The Paradise Papers

Nov 6, 2017

Remember the Panama Papers? It was a massive 2015 document leak that exposed a system in which offshore companies enable crime and corruption. The Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation that followed, led by The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), was a collaboration among more than 100 newsrooms across the world. It led to a flurry of resignations and indictments and took down leaders in Iceland and Pakistan. This week, Reveal journalists teamed up with ICIJ for a new bombshell: The Paradise Papers.

In a long-ago neutron star collision, scientists find a cosmic goldmine

Nov 6, 2017

Around 130 million years ago, two neutron stars — those strange, compacted cores of dead stars — smashed into one another. The resulting “kilonova” explosion sent ripples through space-time and hurtled heavy metals like platinum and gold into space. Now, astronomers have detected the signals from that long-ago collision, in the form of gravitational waves and electromagnetic signals. 

 US Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr CC BY 2.0

Budget resolutions passed in the US House and Senate will likely lead to drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge’s pristine coastal plain, if they’re approved in their current form.

The Trump administration wants to put Americans back on the moon

Nov 5, 2017
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/emmett_ns_tullos/179781786/">Emmett Tullos</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>. Image cropped.

The United States’ newly revived National Space Council recently met for the first time, and in a speech before the council — tasked with setting the country’s space agenda — Vice President Mike Pence called for a return to the moon and the development of a base there.

Alexei Nikolsky/Kremlin-Sputnik

Vladimir Putin came late to the cyber arena.

Up until a few years ago, the Russian leader seemed to all but ignore the internet and spoke out loudly against it. He called the web a "CIA project," with interests that opposed Russia.

Author Richard Lourie says that's basically because Putin is "a television guy."

GOES-16

This year’s deadly hurricanes, record-shattering firestorms and severe drought are linked to global warming, and the prospect of more unpleasant surprises seems likely, climate experts warn.

“What we're seeing is the veritable tip of the iceberg,” says Michael Mann, distinguished professor of atmospheric science and director of the Earth Systems Science Center at Penn State University.

When Science Takes The Freelance Route

Nov 4, 2017

Does Math Have A Place In The Courtroom?

Nov 4, 2017

Killer Cone Snails…For Your Health?

Nov 4, 2017

A Space Rock Makes An Interstellar Visit

Nov 4, 2017
Jan van der Ploeg/CIFOR, Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Conventional wisdom has long held that tropical forests soak up carbon dioxide and help blunt the impact of industrial greenhouse gas emissions. But new research finds that the tropics are now adding to the problem of global warming faster than they can absorb excess carbon.

In other words, tropical forests are now a net carbon source rather than the carbon "sinks" they were previously thought to be.

Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

It’s been more than 50 years since Dr. Jane Goodall first traveled to Gombe, Tanzania, as an amateur scientist and began amassing observations that would change the way we understand chimpanzees and even humans. Now a new documentary, “JANE,” reconstructs Goodall’s time in the Gombe forest, drawing on a trove of recently discovered archival footage.

How a rapper's radio interview revealed a Saudi soft power campaign

Nov 1, 2017

Is a foreign government funding that interview you’re reading or the podcast you’re listening to?

In early August, The Takeaway received an email with the subject line: “Feature Idea: The Middle East’s #1 Hip-Hop Artist Tours U.S.”

The science behind 'baby talk'

Oct 31, 2017
<a href="https://pixabay.com/en/baby-child-newborn-arms-499976/">jakobking85</a>/<a href="https://pixabay.com/en/service/terms/#usage">CC0</a>. Image cropped.

We’ve all heard adults cooing to babies in “baby talk” — that high-pitched, singsong cadence we tend to slip into around infants. The overall effect of baby talk may sound unnatural, but as Princeton neuroscientist Elise Piazza explains, the exaggerated high pitch, repetition, rhythm and even the pauses in baby talk can give babies important acoustical information about how language works.

Who is George Papadopoulos?

Oct 31, 2017

Monday’s 12-count indictment against former Trump aides Paul Manafort and Rick Gates includes a slew of charges, from money laundering to failing to file reports of foreign bank and financial accounts to conspiracy against the United States.   

Diversity and equality remain elusive in ballet

Oct 30, 2017
Mohd Rasfan/Reuters

Choreographer Benjamin Millepied likes to push the bounds of ballet.

In a recent piece he created for the American Ballet Theatre, dancers appear in the lobby during intermission, swirling through the space usually reserved for audience members waiting for the next act.

"It does change this idea of ballet as behind this red curtain,” says Millepied. The French-born dancer-turned-choreographer has been on a mission to make ballet relevant — to bring it out from behind that red curtain — for years.

The Trump-Russia investigation: A timeline

Oct 30, 2017
Carlos Barria/Reuters&nbsp;

Possible ties between the Kremlin and President Donald Trump have dominated headlines for months. Here's everything you need to know about the ongoing investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and the Kremlin's alleged collusion with the Trump campaign.

Wikimedia Commons

New research suggests that declining levels of iron, zinc and protein resulting from high levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are putting human health at risk, especially in the developing world.

As global carbon dioxide levels climb, plants are becoming better at photosynthesis

Oct 28, 2017
Bill Dickinson, Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

A recent study shows that increased carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere is leading to higher rates of photosynthesis in vegetation.

The Future, Coming ‘Soonish’

Oct 28, 2017

Is It Time For CRISPR 2.0?

Oct 28, 2017

In Defense Of Spiders

Oct 28, 2017
Brian Smithers

Many species of trees tend to move to higher, cooler habitats in response to a warming climate. Now, research on two pine tree species in the western US Great Basin shows some species move faster than others.

Brian Smithers, who led the research at the University of California, Davis, says when he wanted to look at how trees are responding to climate change, he realized the high-altitude tree line is a "really nice experimental spot to do that.”

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