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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

President Donald Trump has made it clear from day one that his administration will push an “America first” policy platform. So when he announced last week that May 1 — commonly known as International Workers’ Day or May Day — would be celebrated nationwide as “Loyalty Day,” many of his critics were quick to attack the declaration as an alarming example of the president's nationalism.

President Trump, how will your tax plan spur economic growth?

May 1, 2017
Carlos Barria/Reuters

Over President Donald Trump's first 100 days, we're asking him questions that our audience wants answers to. Join the project by tweeting this question to @realDonaldTrump with the hashtag #100Days100Qs.

#96. @realDonaldTrump, how will your tax plan spur economic growth? #100Days100Qs

Courtesy of Buffalo Public Schools via Twitter 

Byron W. Brown, the mayor of Buffalo, says his community is not a "sanctuary city," but a "refugee resettlement city."

According to a February 2016 report published by the New York community, “Between 2006 and 2013, the foreign-born population in Buffalo increased by 95 percent, and the most recent American Community Survey reports that the city is home to over 22,000 foreign-born residents.”

Is it murder if there’s no homicide?

Apr 25, 2017
Courtesy of the Bukowsky Law Firm

Jessie McKim has spent the last 20 years behind bars for a murder that never took place.

McKim of Kirksville, Missouri, is serving a life sentence without parole for murdering Wendy Wagnon back in 1997. (He was convicted in 1999.) But back in 2013, it was determined that Wagnon actually died from a meth overdose, even though prosecutors have argued that McKim strangled her. However, while the science says Wagnon was not murdered, a judge has denied McKim's request for relief because he has “not conclusively proved his innocence."

How Trump's border wall demands could lead to a government shutdown

Apr 24, 2017
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters 

The deadline for Congress to pass a new federal budget — this Friday at midnight — is fast approaching, and recently, there appeared to be bipartisan support for a compromise. However, last week the White House introduced a new spending measure that seems to have scuttled that progress and could, potentially, result in a government shutdown.

After decades, military commissaries ready for big changes

Mar 6, 2017
Dorian Merina/American Homefront

Military commissaries, the discount grocery stores found on U.S. bases around the world, are bracing for big changes as lawmakers and the Department of Defense seek to reduce their reliance on taxpayer funds.

The reforms were set in motion by a law passed late last year . The commissaries are considered a military benefit for service members and their families.

Robert Finley is not your average new artist.

At 63, the north Louisiana blues and soul musician has already lived a lifetime. He served as a helicopter serviceman in the Army in the ’70s and worked as a carpenter for decades until he started to lose his sight a few years ago.

Unable to continue working, Finley fell back on his dream: singing and playing guitar.

What To Do If You're Struggling To Sleep

Sep 26, 2016

Many people have trouble sleeping, at least sometimes. Symptoms of insomnia are the most common sleep disorder and affect about one third of Americans at some point in their lives.

But chronic insomnia — when trouble sleeping persists for more than a month, and alters how you feel and perform during the day — is different, and affects about 8 to 10 percent of Americans.

So what should you do when you’re having trouble sleeping?

Viewership numbers for tonight’s first presidential debate are expected to reach record-breaking levels, as Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head to head onstage together for the first time.

Political commentators Paris Dennard and Angela Rye join Here & Now‘s Robin Young and Peter O’Dowd to discuss what to watch for tonight.

Guests

Opal Lee, an 89-year-old woman from Fort Worth, Texas, is on a mission to make Juneteenth a nationally observed holiday.

Juneteenth, or June 19, 1865, was the day word arrived in Texas that slavery had been abolished. To bring attention to her cause, she’s on a symbolic walk to Washington.

Christopher Connelly from KERA in Dallas reports.

Reporter

Homeowners have been fleeing high-cost states like California for cheaper states like Arizona and Texas for some time, but the impact of high real estate prices is striking, according to an analysis by the company CoreLogic.

It says that for every buyer moving to California, more than two are leaving.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News about the latest data.

Guest

Edward Albee, author of such plays as “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf,” died on Sept. 16. He was 88.

Albee won three Tony Awards during his career — including one for lifetime achievement — as well as three Pulitzer Prizes.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young spoke with Albee in 2007 about his advice for aspiring writers and his thoughts on the future of American theater.

Guest

Edward Albee, Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright. Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Airbnb, the global home-sharing company, has begun airing ads that show how becoming an Airbnb host has changed peoples’ lives for the better.

The campaign is aimed at countering ads run by hospitality industry groups that claim Airbnb is getting rich while shrinking the local housing market, and avoiding paying taxes that the rest of the industry must pay.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd talks with media analyst John Carroll about how the campaigns are being received.

Guest

The highly anticipated first presidential debate begins Monday at 9 p.m. ET at Hofstra University on Long Island.

While all eyes are on Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, moderator Lester Holt will share some of the spotlight. Both campaigns and the general public are curious to see how strict the NBC anchor will be when it comes to fact-checking the candidates.

NPR’s Domenico Montanaro joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to preview tonight’s debate.

The Colombian government and the rebel group known as FARC took a step toward peace Monday when they signed an accord. It’s designed to end 50 years of bloody conflict that has killed more than 220,000 people and displaced millions more.

FARC is a Marxist group, and the United States backed Colombia’s military campaign against the rebels.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd hears more about the accord and what it means from Latin America scholar Cynthia Arnson.

Guest

America is experiencing an unprecedented opioid epidemic.

On average, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says 78 people die from an opioid-related overdose every day. Prevention and treatment are key to fighting the crisis and new, innovative ideas in both areas are gaining traction in Boston after an opioid “hack-athon.”

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with two of the hack-athon winners, Scott Strode and Aubri Esters, about the impact they hope to have with their projects.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Actress Pamela Adlon Says 'Better Things' Is Dedicated To Her Daughters: Adlon's new FX series is based on her own experience raising three girls as a single mom. Her daughters are "very much a part" of the show, she says.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Snark Aside, Julie Klausner Says 'Difficult People' Is Inspired By Love: Klausner plays an unsuccessful comic who quips about celebrities in her Hulu series. She says that she and her co-star Billy Eichner bonded over their shared love of show business and pop culture.

It has been three years since The Office wrapped, and actor John Krasinski, who played Jim Halpert, is still feeling lucky. Landing a role on the NBC comedy series had been an unfathomably big break for the actor, whose previous work had been in a series of commercials and off-Broadway plays.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Donald Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, is known for his outspoken personality and oversize public image, which he believes help build his brand name.

"Whether it's good press or bad press, it's getting your name out there," Washington Post investigative reporter Michael Kranish tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies. "Getting your name on the gossip pages and the front pages and even the sports pages, [is] all in the effort of building the name."

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

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