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Joshua Roberts/Reuters

Lawmakers are back on Capitol Hill this week, which means that the investigations into possible Russian hacking of the 2016 election and alleged Trump campaign ties to Russia are entering the next phase.

It’s important to remember there are two sides to these investigations, says Betsy Woodruff, political reporter for The Daily Beast.

“One side of the investigation is looking into the possibility that crimes were committed — a criminal investigation. And the other side of the investigation is actually a counterintelligence investigation.”

Mike Segar/Reuters

Every month, dozens of babies are born in Florida to wealthy Russian families.

According to a story in the Daily Beast, the families move in for a few months, have their babies, then make sure their newborns get US citizenship.

“Birth tourism” companies sell packages that cost tens of thousands of dollars, and often steer their clients to Donald Trump-brand properties.

Another week, another Atlantic storm that weather watchers are calling "unprecedented."

Hurricane Irma slammed into the eastern Caribbean and Puerto Rico with 185 mph winds on Wednesday while millions in Haiti, Cuba and Florida fled or hunkered down in anticipation of the storm’s arrival later in the week.

Damir Sagolj/Reuters

Lee So-yeon once reviled the Americans with an almost religious fervor.

She didn’t have much of a choice. Lee was a sergeant in North Korea’s army. All-consuming hatred of the imperial Yankees was a job requirement. “They taught us that Americans are jackals, devouring all other creatures. Americans are also vampires,” Lee says. “Oh, and barbarians, too.”

Running from cops

Sep 7, 2017

In cities across America, black men are on the run. On April 4, 2015, in South Carolina, Walter Scott was killed while running away from a police officer. Eight days later, Freddie Gray ran from police in Baltimore. He was caught and later died in custody. On this episode of Reveal, we explore the consequences of fleeing from the police through two stories, both set in Baltimore.

Salman Rushdie is the author of 12 novels, but he’s still best known for his 1988 book “The Satanic Verses.” It garnered charges of blasphemy from Islamist extremists and even led to the ayatollah of Iran placing a $6 million bounty on Rushdie’s head. Rushdie stretched the bounds of realism and fantasy in “The Satanic Verses,” but in his latest novel he’s doing the opposite.

'13 Reasons Why' suicide controversy continues

Sep 6, 2017

When the Netflix series "13 Reasons Why" debuted last spring, it sparked widespread discussion about how TV and movies should handle the issue of teen suicide. Now that the show is scheduled to begin its second season in 2018, the controversy will likely continue.

Adam Stepien/Agencja Gazeta via Reuters 

Poland was once the pinnacle of democracy in central Europe after the collapse of the Soviet Union — home to the Solidarity movement and Lech Walesa. But as the country lurches to the right politically, joining countries like Hungary, it may find its position in the European Union, and as a democratic country, threatened.

<a href="https://pixabay.com/en/medical-tablets-pills-drug-1572986/">WerbeFabrik</a>/<a href="https://pixabay.com/en/service/terms/#usage">CC0</a>. Image cropped.

When it comes to getting new drugs on the market, testing and clinical trials can take years — but patients with rare or life-threatening illnesses don’t always have that long to wait.

To treat these patients, the Food and Drug Administration accelerates approval of some promising drugs, letting them onto the market based on physical indicators and lab measurements. But afterward, manufacturers must conduct post-approval clinical trials to confirm the drugs’ safety and efficacy.

From day one of the Oroville spillway crisis in February, the California Department of Water Resources has never wavered in its declarations that, despite the disintegration of the massive concrete flood control outlet — and a near-disaster caused by uncontrolled emergency reservoir flows down a rapidly eroding hillside — the stability of the massive dam itself was not and has never been threatened.

What the aye-aye and the woodpecker can tell us about how evolution works

Sep 3, 2017

Is the evolution of particular traits predictable or random? Or put it this way: If we rewound the tape on Earth’s history and started life over again from the very beginning, would the same animals — even humans — still emerge?

The sweet stories of fake fruit flavors

Sep 3, 2017

What do icy cherry popsicles, sweet grape sodas and sticky banana taffy have in common?

For one, we don’t expect them to taste much like the real fruits they’re meant to mimic — but their artificial flavors are familiar and intense, all the same. Where did these fake fruit flavors come from, and why, in 2017, do they still taste so little like the real thing?

How to make biometric technology more secure

Sep 2, 2017

Fingerprint scanners now come standard on most new smartphones, and some devices even feature iris scanners and 2-D facial recognition technology. But with every new step forward in biometrics, it seems a way to “spoof” the technology follows soon behind — from fingerprint replicas to high-resolution photographs of faces and eyes. So, what’s on the horizon in biometric security, and how can we make the technology more secure?

What happened to the moon’s magnetic field?

Sep 2, 2017

The moon doesn’t have a magnetosphere, unlike Earth. The protective bubble shields our upper atmosphere from solar wind — and, it's what makes compasses point north. But billions of years ago, scientists say, the moon did have its own magnetic field. 

REVEAL Fundraiser Episode Fall 2017

Sep 1, 2017

For the 2017 fall fundraising season, here are three of our favorite Reveal stories from this year.

The perfect storm

Sep 1, 2017

Harvey brought unprecedented rain and destruction to Houston Texas, and it will likely take years for the city to recover. In the aftermath of the storm, we get an eyewitness account of what residents are experiencing from Reveal’s Neena Satija. Then we revisit her earlier reporting about Houston’s vulnerability to hurricanes and rain. In 2008, Hurricane Ike swept through Texas, and resulted in billions of dollars in damages. But it could have been much worse. Just like Harvey, that storm turned at the last minute and didn't hit Houston head on.

The Trump-Russia investigation: A timeline

Aug 29, 2017
Carlos Barria/Reuters&nbsp;

Possible ties between the Kremlin and President Donald Trump have dominated headlines for months. Here's everything you need to know about the ongoing investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and the Kremlin's alleged collusion with the Trump campaign.

Trump's Arpaio pardon draws bipartisan criticism

Aug 28, 2017
Brian Snyder/Reuters file photo

Late last month, former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio was convicted by a federal judge of criminal contempt. The judge ruled that Arpaio had deliberately ignored a 2011 federal injunction to stop racially profiling Latinos, which stemmed from a class action lawsuit.

How much is President Donald Trump worth? And is he or anyone in his administration profiting from their positions? Reveal is teaming up with the Center for Public Integrity to investigate those questions. We’ve created a database listing all the assets that members of his administration have disclosed. Now we’re digging through those documents to see whether there are any conflicts of interest. We’ve posted the information online, and we’re asking the public to take part in our investigation. Citizen sleuths already have uncovered some leads.

Of global warming, plastic waste and velociraptors

Aug 26, 2017
Wikimedia Commons/CC BY-SA 4.0

What do these three things have in common: the Earth’s temperature, waste from plastic products and velociraptors?

Answer: not much. Except they were all recently in the news and all are really interesting, or disturbing, depending on your point of view.

First: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NOAA, declared the first six months of 2017 the second warmest on record, just behind 2016’s all-time record. Why is this news? Because climate scientists had expected temperatures to cool down, and they haven’t much.

Alex Newman/PRI

In a cramped Harvard University sub-basement, a team of women is working to document the rich history of their predecessors.

More than 40 years before women gained the right to vote, women labored in the Harvard College Observatory as “computers” — astronomy’s version of NASA’s “Hidden Figures” mathematicians.

Ellen Abbott / WSKG

 

(WRVO) The 2017 edition of the New York State Fair opens Wednesday near Syracuse. The fair has typically opened on a Thursday, but it's opening a day early this year, with officials calling it "Preview Day." 

Why did ISIS target Spain? The answer may lie in history.

Aug 21, 2017
Sergio Perez

On Thursday, a van ran over pedestrians on Barcelona’s Las Ramblas strip. It took a very short time for ISIS to claim responsibility for the attack.

At least 13 people died and around 100 people were injured.

But why did ISIS target Spain, now, for practically the first time? 

Related: See all the terrorist attacks around the world from 2016

There could be many answers to this question.

Wiki Commons

It didn’t take President Donald Trump long to condemn the terror attack in Barcelona on Thursday. But his follow-up tweet has raised some serious eyebrows among historians, veterans, human rights groups and counterterrorism experts:

Jonathan Drake/Reuters

Here's a question many of us have been debating since the deadly protests in Charlottesville last weekend: What should be done with a monument dedicated to a Confederate figure? Should it be taken down? Or should it be recontextualized? 

It's a question similar to one Paraguayans had to answer not long ago. The debate in that South American country revolved around a statue of longtime dictator General Alfredo Stroessner.

The aftermath of the deadly attacks in Barcelona

Aug 18, 2017

Thousands of people marched to the Plaça de Catalunya in Barcelona Friday, chanting “I'm not afraid” in Catalan. It was a show of solidarity after a series of terrorist attacks claimed by ISIS rocked Spain. About 14 people were killed and several more were injured in the tourist-heavy Las Ramblas area of Barcelona when a van plowed into pedestrians. Liz Castro, a writer and longtime resident of Barcelona, witnessed the march on Friday.

Joshua Roberts/Reuters&nbsp;

Peter didn’t want to use his real name because he’s afraid of becoming a target for white nationalists.

He was one of the counter-protesters in Charlottesville on Saturday — the ones President Donald Trump on Tuesday referred to as “very violent” and “charging with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs.”

I first reached out to Peter in July, over Skype, when I was doing research on a movement called antifa, short for anti-fascist.

In the wake of the protests by neo-Nazis and white supremacists that turned deadly in Charlottesville, Virginia, President Donald Trump has come under fire for not immediately and clearly condemning American racists. It’s not the first time. Trump and those close to him have often played down the threat of violence committed by white supremacists across the country. This week, through interviews with key Trump supporters and advisers, we explore if we should have seen Charlottesville coming and if we should expect more race-based clashes on the way.

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