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Baby Boxes, Singing Fish, And E-DNA

Jun 24, 2017

Caught On Video: How DNA Replicates

Jun 24, 2017

Getting To Know The Placenta

Jun 24, 2017
Brendan McDermid/Reuters

The gruesome killing of a 17-year-old girl in Virginia this week has become fuel for political narratives on either side of the US spectrum.

Nabra Hassanen was with friends outside her mosque, the All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Center, when a driver rode over the curb and scattered the crowd of teens. He then took Hassanen in his car and beat her to death with a bat.

A top US ally runs secret torture prisons in Yemen

Jun 23, 2017

The list of abuses being faced by people in secret prisons across Yemen is long — electric shocks, beatings with metal objects, forced nudity, sexual harassment, threats, sleep deprivation and sensory deprivation.

Courtesy of Family Reunions Project

It’s a typical country wedding in Mexico, this one taking place in the town of Poza Redonda, in the state of San Luis Potosí. The bride and groom exchange vows and then things get rowdy with a traditional dance, clapping and flashing lights.

There are some 320 million people in the US. Forty-three million of them were born abroad. More than 20 million immigrants are US citizens. About 11 million people are undocumented and more than 5.1 million children have one or more undocumented parents. Roughly 860,000 people have applied for temporary legal status because they were brought to the US as children without proper documentation. More than 500,000 people are waiting for their cases to be heard in immigration courts. Some 270,000 people in the US came as refugees.

Tiziana Rinaldi/PRI

Ravi Ragbir spent a big part of his morning one day last week asking people who were filing into a New York City federal building a simple question.

“What’s going on? Do you need help?”

He stood near the Worth Street entrance of the Jacob K. Javits federal office building, in lower Manhattan, where the New York field office of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is located. It’s the same building that may swallow Ragbir up on March 9.

Ravi Ragbir is a popular immigrant organizer in New York City. He’s been running the New York City Sanctuary Coalition for nearly a decade, and supporting migrants who are either detained or threatened with removal.

But now his own private struggle with deportation has become a big part of his work.

On Thursday, he took a dozen people with him to a scheduled meeting with immigration agents. He came to the US as a legal permanent resident, but was ordered deported after being convicted of an aggravated felony in 2001.

Growing up in the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas, 24-year-old Julio Cesar Ramos didn’t know he was undocumented. He was in 10th grade when he had to fill out an application to go on a field trip that required him to include his social security number.

“I went back and asked my mom what’s my social security number and that kind of began the whole discussion of, ‘We don’t have one,’” says Ramos.

That experience motivated him to work even harder in school. But it was another life experience, that helped shape his future.

After a series of secretive meetings, Republican lawmakers in the Senate have finally revealed their plan to repeal and replace huge parts of the Affordable Care Act.

Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters

Brazil's federal police, who have a role analogous to the FBI, reported to the Supreme Court this week they found evidence that President Michel Temer participated in corruption and recommended he be investigated.

If such an investigation is opened, Temer would have to step down.

Trial and terror

Jun 22, 2017

President Donald Trump has used the threat of foreign-born terrorists to justify his travel ban – but since 9/11, nearly every terrorist attack in the United States has come from within. On this episode of Reveal, we investigate which domestic terror episodes get tracked and why.

The battle is still raging in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul.

ISIS militants are cornered in the Old City. Iraqi and coalition forces are advancing slowly, capturing as little as one city block per day — if that. And ISIS fighters continue to strike back. On Wednesday, they seemed to detonate explosives at Mosul's 12th-century mosque. That iconic structure — with its famous leaning minaret — is now in ruins.

Nabih Bulos, a special correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, left Mosul on Tuesday. He says ISIS is using everything it has to hold on.

Edgar Su/Reuters

After weeks of closed-door meetings, Senate Republicans on Thursday unveiled a draft of their plan to overhaul the US health system.

America's ring of fire

Jun 14, 2017

Last fall, Reveal reporters found that wildfires were spreading to new parts of the country, and to more densely populated areas. Now, we revisit that hour with a new story about Kansas, a state that’s battling not only wildfires, but also significant underfunding of its forest firefighter team.

Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

President Donald Trump has made it clear from day one that his administration will push an “America first” policy platform. So when he announced last week that May 1 — commonly known as International Workers’ Day or May Day — would be celebrated nationwide as “Loyalty Day,” many of his critics were quick to attack the declaration as an alarming example of the president's nationalism.

President Trump, how will your tax plan spur economic growth?

May 1, 2017
Carlos Barria/Reuters

Over President Donald Trump's first 100 days, we're asking him questions that our audience wants answers to. Join the project by tweeting this question to @realDonaldTrump with the hashtag #100Days100Qs.

#96. @realDonaldTrump, how will your tax plan spur economic growth? #100Days100Qs

Courtesy of Buffalo Public Schools via Twitter 

Byron W. Brown, the mayor of Buffalo, says his community is not a "sanctuary city," but a "refugee resettlement city."

According to a February 2016 report published by the New York community, “Between 2006 and 2013, the foreign-born population in Buffalo increased by 95 percent, and the most recent American Community Survey reports that the city is home to over 22,000 foreign-born residents.”

Is it murder if there’s no homicide?

Apr 25, 2017
Courtesy of the Bukowsky Law Firm

Jessie McKim has spent the last 20 years behind bars for a murder that never took place.

McKim of Kirksville, Missouri, is serving a life sentence without parole for murdering Wendy Wagnon back in 1997. (He was convicted in 1999.) But back in 2013, it was determined that Wagnon actually died from a meth overdose, even though prosecutors have argued that McKim strangled her. However, while the science says Wagnon was not murdered, a judge has denied McKim's request for relief because he has “not conclusively proved his innocence."

How Trump's border wall demands could lead to a government shutdown

Apr 24, 2017
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters 

The deadline for Congress to pass a new federal budget — this Friday at midnight — is fast approaching, and recently, there appeared to be bipartisan support for a compromise. However, last week the White House introduced a new spending measure that seems to have scuttled that progress and could, potentially, result in a government shutdown.

After decades, military commissaries ready for big changes

Mar 6, 2017
Dorian Merina/American Homefront

Military commissaries, the discount grocery stores found on U.S. bases around the world, are bracing for big changes as lawmakers and the Department of Defense seek to reduce their reliance on taxpayer funds.

The reforms were set in motion by a law passed late last year . The commissaries are considered a military benefit for service members and their families.

Robert Finley is not your average new artist.

At 63, the north Louisiana blues and soul musician has already lived a lifetime. He served as a helicopter serviceman in the Army in the ’70s and worked as a carpenter for decades until he started to lose his sight a few years ago.

Unable to continue working, Finley fell back on his dream: singing and playing guitar.

What To Do If You're Struggling To Sleep

Sep 26, 2016

Many people have trouble sleeping, at least sometimes. Symptoms of insomnia are the most common sleep disorder and affect about one third of Americans at some point in their lives.

But chronic insomnia — when trouble sleeping persists for more than a month, and alters how you feel and perform during the day — is different, and affects about 8 to 10 percent of Americans.

So what should you do when you’re having trouble sleeping?

Viewership numbers for tonight’s first presidential debate are expected to reach record-breaking levels, as Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head to head onstage together for the first time.

Political commentators Paris Dennard and Angela Rye join Here & Now‘s Robin Young and Peter O’Dowd to discuss what to watch for tonight.

Guests

Opal Lee, an 89-year-old woman from Fort Worth, Texas, is on a mission to make Juneteenth a nationally observed holiday.

Juneteenth, or June 19, 1865, was the day word arrived in Texas that slavery had been abolished. To bring attention to her cause, she’s on a symbolic walk to Washington.

Christopher Connelly from KERA in Dallas reports.

Reporter

Homeowners have been fleeing high-cost states like California for cheaper states like Arizona and Texas for some time, but the impact of high real estate prices is striking, according to an analysis by the company CoreLogic.

It says that for every buyer moving to California, more than two are leaving.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News about the latest data.

Guest

Edward Albee, author of such plays as “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf,” died on Sept. 16. He was 88.

Albee won three Tony Awards during his career — including one for lifetime achievement — as well as three Pulitzer Prizes.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young spoke with Albee in 2007 about his advice for aspiring writers and his thoughts on the future of American theater.

Guest

Edward Albee, Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright. Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

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